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Java Newsletters Archive: 174
Monday, February 02, 2004 (16:04:31)

Posted by jalex

=== [ The Java FAQ Daily Tips, weekly publication ] ===

 Issue No: 174                                            17 July 2003
13637 subscribers    

Foreword: Excuse me for possible mistakes. English is not native language for me.

In this issue:
  • 1. On some Windows 2000 machines our application (uses Java 2D) causes system crash - blue screen of Windows death Smile...
  • 2. How can I completely clean up my Windows XP from Microsoft JVM before I install Sun Microsystems JVM?
  • 3. Latest posts on our message board
  • 4. Link to Java FAQ

  • Hello dear friends!

    Tip 1

    Question: On some Windows 2000 machines our application (uses Java 2D) causes system crash - blue screen of Windows death Smile...

    Answer: It can happen if you J2SE 1.4.1 and later. The problem is not in Java itself but rather in obsolete video drivers that can contain bugs. Java 2D functionality in J2SE 1.4.1 and beyond is implemented using DirectDraw and Direct3D for various off screen rendering functions.
    Possible solution is to update video driver. Find out what is chipset your graphical card uses and then go to the site of manufacturer, for example http://www.atitech.com

    If it does not help you can run your application with different flags.

    One example of a known problem is that using Direct3D on some small subset of Windows 2000 systems has been known to cause a system crash. You can also try launching your application with the following command-line flag set:

    -Dsun.java2d.d3d=false

    This forcibly disables our use of Direct3D and avoids any Direct3D-specific problems.
    You can also try the following flag:

    -Dsun.java2d.ddoffscreen=false

    This flag disables our use of DirectDraw and Direct3D for off screen images (such as the Swing back buffer).
    If a problem persists, try launching the application with this flag:

    -Dsun.java2d.noddraw=true

    This flag disables our use of DirectDraw and Direct3D completely and thus avoids any problems you may be seeing associated with our use of those APIs and their respective drivers on your system.

    This tip is based on release notes for J2SE 1.4.2:

    http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.4.2/relnotes.html#vm


    Tip 2

    Question: How can I completely clean up my Windows XP from Microsoft JVM before I install Sun Microsystems JVM?

    Answer: You might want to remove the Microsoft JVM, which Microsoft no longer supports, in favor of the more recent Sun Microsystems JVM. To remove the Microsoft JVM, perform the following steps:

       1. From the Start menu, select Run.
       2. Enter the command
           RunDll32 advpack.dll,LaunchINFSection java.inf,UnInstall
           to start the uninstall process
       3. Click Yes to the confirmation, then select Reboot.
       4. After the machine restarts, delete the following items:
           the \%systemroot%java folder
           java.pnf from the \%systemroot%inf folder
           jview.exe and wjview.exe from the \%systemroot%system32 folder
          The HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftJava VM registry subkey
          The HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINESOFTWAREMicrosoftInternet
          ExplorerAdvancedOptionsJAVA_VM registry subkey (to remove the Microsoft
          Internet Explorer (IE) options)

    Now you can get latest JVM from Sun!


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